Horniman Library catalogue loaded

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of the Horniman Library have been added to Copac.

The Horniman Library

The Horniman Library. Image copyright: Horniman Museum and Gardens

The Horniman Library collection contains books from the 16th century through to the present day. Holdings range from academic texts to accounts by early explorers and illustrated monographs. The collection covers a wide spectrum of subject areas related to the remit of the museum, focusing on natural history, anthropology and musical instruments.

The collection, which originated with Frederick Horniman’s own book collection, has been added to by subsequent directors, curators and librarians and now amounts to some 30,000 volumes.

The development of the library collections has been closely linked to object acquisition and curatorial practice in the museum and thus there is a strong connection between the book and object collections.

The library collection is primarily a resource for Horniman staff, and scholars with specific research needs. Public access is maintained to the library collections through our family reading programmes, including pop up library events in the museum and family reading spaces in our galleries, such as the Under 5s Book Zone beside the Apostle Clock on the North Hall Balcony.

To browse or limit your search to the Horniman Library, select the Main Search tab in Copac and choose ‘Horniman Library’ from the list of libraries.

University of Leicester Library: full catalogue loaded

We’re pleased to announce that the full holdings of the University of Leicester Library have been added to Copac.

Photograph of David Wilson Library at night.

David Wilson Library at night. Image copyright: University of Leicester.

Copac previously included the records for Leicester’s Special Collections and the holdings of the Mathematical Association Library. However this has now been expanded to include Leicester’s complete holdings.

The University of Leicester Library is housed in the David Wilson building. The Library contains over a million items and includes 1500 user spaces of all types, 350 PCs, 14 Group study rooms and a Special Collections Suite constructed to BS5454 standard, as well as several specialist study rooms and wireless network throughout. The building won the 2008 RIBA East Midlands Award for Architecture. It was designed by Associated Architects, and was formally opened by Her Majesty the Queen in 2007.

Leicester’s Special Collections include primary materials relating to Leicester authors, such as Sue Townsend and Joe Orton, extensive medieval manuscripts, and 19th century periodicals. One highlight is the Robjohns Collection, which contains most of the university’s medieval manuscripts and the library’s oldest book, a 12th century commentary on the Psalms by Gilbert de la Porée (Gilbertus Porretanus), Bishop of Tours (d. 1154).

The Special Collections also include the English Local History collection, which contains materials relating to English local topography, social and political history. The collection began with the Hatton collection (a special collection) which was donated in 1920-21 to coincide with the opening of the University (then the Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland College). It was donated by Thomas Hatton, a local boot manufacturer, and includes his topographical library and major county histories.

The Mathematical Association (MA) was formed in 1871 as the Association for the Improvement of Geometrical Teaching. The MA is now the leading UK association for mathematical education at all levels from primary school to university, including postgraduate work. The MA library started on a very small scale in the 19th century and now comprises nearly 11000 text books, popular mathematics and higher mathematics books, and around 700 runs of mathematical periodicals from many different countries.  The library also includes an exceptional collection of 300 largely mathematical manuscript exercise books from the 18th and 19th centuries: the John Hersee Collection. The MA library as a whole is a unique resource for the history of mathematics and its teaching, learning and popularisation in the UK from the 16th to the 21st centuries.

Since the mid-1950s, the collection has been accommodated in the University of Leicester Library, where the Special Collections include around 850 of the MA’s older (pre-1850) and rarer books and mathematical serials.  The oldest book in the collection is a 1533 edition in Greek of Euclid’s Elements.

To browse or limit your search to Leicester’s holdings, select the Main Search tab in Copac and choose ‘Leicester University’ from the list of libraries. Once you have done so you will be given the option to limit your search further, to the holdings of either the main library, or those of the Mathematical Association.

University of Sheffield Festival of Arts & Humanities Showcase Event

Jacky Hodgson, Head of Special Collections at the Western Bank Library, University of Sheffield, tells us about an event showcasing items from their collections to an audience beyond the University.

As part of the third Sheffield Festival of Arts & Humanities, the University of Sheffield Library’s Special Collections team recently took part in a Showcase Event in the Millennium Galleries in Sheffield city centre. Alongside us were colleagues from the National Fairground & Circus Archive (whose collections can be browsed at the Archives Hub), and many academics and students from across the Faculty of Arts & Humanities, presenting bite-size talks, activities and materials relating to their research interests to the general public.

The Special Collections team decided to showcase a variety of materials from our archive and rare book collections which support academic research, some of it relating to the local area and some of more general interest. As well as a stall on which to display physical objects for visitors to look at and handle, we also used a plasma screen to highlight some of our digital collections.

Examples of the collections on digital display included:

  • Photographs of late 19th century Sheffield from the Beet Lantern Slide Collection, a collection of almost 2,500 magic lantern slides covering a wide range of subjects, originally assembled by Arthur Edgar Beet in the early twentieth century
  • Twenty-four digitised images from the portfolio of hand-coloured lithographs entitled Recollections of the Great Exhibition 1851 

    Lithograph illustration from Recollections of the Great Exhibition 1851

    De Le Rue’s Stationary Stand and Envelope Machine, from Recollections of the Great Exhibition 1851

  • A selection of images from the Knoop Far East Photographic Collection (http://www.shef.ac.uk/library/special/knoop), documenting a visit to China, Korea, Japan and many other lands in 1913-1914 by Douglas Knoop, lecturer in Economics at the University of Sheffield

    Photograph of dancing Geisha girls

    Dancing Geisha girls, Japan (1913), from the Knoop Far East Photographic Collection

  • A sound recording of the Sheffield miner and poet ‘Totley Tom’ Hague, reciting some of his dialect verse

We also displayed material from our physical collections relating to research being carried out by academic colleagues in the Faculty of Arts & Humanities, including:

  • Documents from the recently deposited James Montgomery & Sheffield Sunday Schools Union Archive, including hymn sheets and programmes for Whitsuntide gatherings, newspaper cuttings and scrapbooks

The event ran from 11am to 4pm on Saturday 11 March 2017, with the opportunity to set up the stall from 9am. Four members of the Special Collections team took part, two in the morning and two in the afternoon. As well as the material on display, we also took our pop-up banner giving information about our collections and our contact details, plus flyers and postcards inviting visitors to register to be kept informed about future activities.

Photo of the Special Collections stall

The Special Collections stall at the Arts & Humanities showcase event

It was an enjoyable and successful day – time flew by as we chatted to a steady flow of visitors about the material on display. Some of our visitors were members of the Faculty of Arts & Humanities who were interested to see a few of our less well known collections, but the majority were members of the public curious to know more about the University’s research and collections.

The caricatures volume drew particular interest, as did the Whit Walks hymn sheets which brought back memories for some of the older visitors.  We were also asked some general questions about using archives for family and local history research. Organisers reported that around 1,000 people visited the event during the course of the day, and that feedback was extremely positive.

The cutter cut up, or, the monster at full length… Anon (1790), from the collection of caricatures

As well as our colleagues from the National Fairground & Circus Archive, other stalls included Dr Jonathan Rayner’s research into the First World War magazine The War Illustrated which is held in our collections;  the AHRC-funded Digital Panopticon project, enabling researchers to trace and explore the lives of convicts between 1780 and 1925; an opportunity provided by the Sheffield Institute for Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies (SIIBS) for children to create a Greek Pantry God (Zeus Ktesios); and (rather worryingly for us librarians!) a family activity which involved chopping up books to create a stop-motion animation.

Cover of The War Illustrated Vol. 3, No. 72 (1916), from the War Magazines Collection

All in all, a very enjoyable and worthwhile occasion, providing us with the opportunity to showcase some of our collections and our work to the local community outside the University, and also to discover more about the research that our academic colleagues are engaged in.

Jacky Hodgson
Head of Special Collections
Western Bank Library
University of Sheffield

All images copyright the University of Sheffield Library and Michael Kindellan/Constitutional Information, reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright holders.

Science Museum Library catalogue loaded

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of the Science Museum Library have been added to Copac.

Dana Research Centre and Library, Science Museum

Dana Research Centre and Library, Science Museum. © Timothy Soar, by permission of Coffey Architects

The Science Museum’s world-class library collections chart the global development of science, engineering and medicine from the fifteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Holdings include academic and scholarly works, textbooks and popular works in English and other European languages, as well as books on the history and biography of science, technology and medicine, and their social impact.

Around 5800 books are available at the Dana Research Centre and Library in London, but nearly all of the collections are stored at the Science Museum’s Wroughton facility near Swindon, and selected items can be transported to the library in London for consultation there. The Library holds around 143000 books at Wroughton and significant collections of journals, British patents, trade literature and other ephemera.

The Science Museum’s records were previously supplied to Copac alongside the catalogue of Imperial College London, but are now being supplied directly from the Science Museum, after the opening of their new Dana Research Centre and Library in London in 2015.

To browse, or limit your search to the Science Museum Library, select the Main Search tab in Copac and choose ‘Science Museum Library’ from the list of libraries.

British School at Athens Library catalogue loaded

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of the British School at Athens (BSA Library website) have been added to Copac.

British School at Athens Library.

British School at Athens Library. Copyright: BSA.

The British School at Athens is the United Kingdom’s hub for advanced research in the humanities and social sciences in Greece and its wider Balkan, Levantine, Mediterranean, and European contexts. The Library is at the heart of the BSA’s work in Athens, providing researchers with 24 hour access to a collection of more than 60,000 monographs, 1,300 periodical titles and a growing collection of electronic resources.

The collection covers all aspects of Hellenic Studies, with particular emphasis on:

• Art and archaeology of the Greek world
• Archaeology from the Balkans and Black Sea
• Archaeological Theory and Material Sciences
• Epigraphy
• Byzantine art and architecture
• Travellers to Greece
• A Rare Book collection based on the library of George Finlay

To browse, or limit your search to the British School at Athens Library, go to the main tab on copac.jisc.ac.uk and choose ‘British School at Athens’ from the list of libraries. Copac is a free service accessible at: http://copac.jisc.ac.uk.

 

University of Reading Library catalogue loaded

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of the University of Reading (http://www.reading.ac.uk/library) have been added to Copac.

Image copyright: University of Reading

Image copyright: University of Reading

The Library is located at the centre of Whiteknights campus and contains over a million items across a variety of subject areas, with a range of collections of specific types of material:

* Artworks in the Library
* Course Collection (items in demand and on reading lists)
* European Documentation Centre
* Government publications
* Journals
* Legislation
* Maps, atlases and gazetteers
* Music
* Parliamentary publications
* Teaching Practice Collection
* Theses

The Library’s Special Collections Services are housed separately, in the same building as the Museum of English Rural Life (MERL). Collections include rare books, archives and manuscripts, and the MERL library and archives.

To browse, or limit your search to University of Reading , go to the main tab on copac.jisc.ac.uk and choose ‘Reading University’ from the list of libraries. Copac is a free service accessible at: http://copac.jisc.ac.uk.

Durham Cathedral’s Treasures

 Durham Cathedral MSS A.I.3 – St Cuthbert ©Chapter of Durham Cathedral


Durham Cathedral MSS A.I.3 – St Cuthbert ©Chapter of Durham Cathedral

Durham Cathedral’s Library can be traced back to the community of St Cuthbert originating in the 7th century at Lindisfarne. After fleeing Holy Island after Viking invasion, they settled in Durham in 995 bringing with them, alongside the body of Cuthbert and his sacred relics, their most precious manuscripts and scholarly works. In 1093, the Normans settled in Durham, establishing a Benedictine Community of Monks, and after the dissolution of the priory in 1539, the cathedral was re-founded under a dean and chapter who inherited much of what survived of the priory’s collection of manuscripts and printed books.

Durham Cathedral maintains the most complete in-situ medieval monastic library in Britain, built around these 308 surviving manuscripts and volumes, and also retains a collection of over 30,000 early printed books dating from the 16th to the 19th century. It also holds a manuscript music collection mostly comprising part-books used by the cathedral choir from the 17th to the 19th century, and printed secular and instrumental music. The post-1851 Chapter collection specialises in church history, local history, bibliography and architecture. We also maintain a modern theological lending library of around 15,000 titles on behalf of the Lord Crewe Trust.

The Cathedral also retains a substantial Archive, one of the most complete and extensive monastic archives to survive in Britain in its original location. Our colleagues at Durham University Library manage the Archives on our behalf. Among the many treasures held in the Archives, the Cathedral remains unique in holding three engrossments of the Magna Carta, alongside their corresponding Charters of the Forest – from 1216, 1225 and 1300.

King John Seal, Magna Carta, 1300 (DCL 2.2.Reg.2 ) ©Chapter of Durham Cathedral

King John Seal, Magna Carta, 1300 (DCL 2.2.Reg.2 ) ©Chapter of Durham Cathedral

The library is perhaps somewhat unique in that it retains responsibility not only for the paper and parchment collections owned by the Cathedral, but for all of its objects too. We care for tens of thousands of artefacts of historical, cultural, and religious significance including paintings, carved stones, textiles, metalwork, and even whale bones. The collections date as far back as the Anglo-Saxon period, and include the holy relics of St Cuthbert.

My role as Head of Collections is a busy one, overseeing the management of two Reading Rooms in order to facilitate access to the library collections (modern and historic), and since July, also having oversight of the Cathedral’s Open Treasure exhibition spaces. The claustral spaces have been opened to the public to host an interactive display showcasing the history of the Cathedral, the life of St Cuthbert and the many facets of life in a monastic community. We have also developed new exhibition galleries which will allow us to display many of the Cathedral’s treasured manuscripts and artefacts in environmentally controlled conditions. It’s an exciting opportunity to not only permanently display the relics of St Cuthbert in a beautiful environment which will help protect the objects, but also to be able to manage an ever-changing exhibition programme to allow people to see the wide range of objects held by the Cathedral. More information can be found here: https://www.durhamcathedral.co.uk/open-treasure.

Open Treasure, Monks’ Dormitory ©Peter Burmann

Open Treasure, Monks’ Dormitory ©Peter Burmann

To support Open Treasure, and to complement the exhibitions, new outreach programmes have been developed. The library plays a lead role through hosting visits from reading groups, displaying volumes from the collections which will hopefully inspire further learning and interest.

We will also contribute to the Education team’s Young Curator’s group. Targeting 11-15 year olds, the programme will teach children all about the art of creating an exhibition, to mirror those the Cathedral are creating.

The collections have traditionally been made available in a broader sense in a variety of ways.

Refectory Library ©Peter Burmann

Refectory Library ©Peter Burmann

Library staff undertake numerous displays and tours for all sorts of groups and to the public on a dizzying array of subjects – catering for coach parties, architecture and medieval manuscript students, specialist academics attending study days during Holy Week, potential donors, and on open days to the public.

Our visitors appreciate the opportunity to see material which is usually locked away and out of sight   – it can inspire that desire to learn more and widen access to the collections in the most positive of ways, adding an extra understanding to people’s concepts about the Cathedral and its wider role.

While Open Treasure will keep us even busier, we welcome the opportunity to showcase our collections in a beautiful and environmentally stable location. If you ever find yourself in Durham, please let us know. We would be delighted to show you around.

Lisa Di Tommaso
Head of Collections

All images copyright the Chapter of Durham Cathedral and Peter Burmann and reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright holders.

Royal College of Nursing Library catalogue loaded

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of the Royal College of Nursing Library have been added to Copac.

Photo of Royal College of Nursing Library

Royal College of Nursing Library. Image copyright: Royal College of Nursing, London

The Royal College of Nursing Library and Archive Service is Europe’s largest nursing resource, with a wealth of print and e-resources.

The Collection dates mainly from the 1850s onwards. We strive to remain the pre-eminent specialist nursing collection of English language materials in Europe: collecting books, journals, nursing PhD theses, pamphlets, rare grey literature, audio-visual, digital objects, oral histories, images and archives through to the most recent e-books, e-journals and e-resources.

The Royal College of Nursing is a professional UK membership body and union of over 400,000 registered nurses, midwives, health care assistants and nursing students.

The Library and Archive Service supports our members, who work in a range of health care specialties and settings in the NHS and independent sectors. Around 35,000 nursing students are members.

To browse, or limit your search to the Royal College of Nursing Library, go to the main tab on copac.jisc.ac.uk and choose ‘Royal College of Nursing Library’ from the list of libraries.

 

The Library of the Zoological Society of London

A couple of months ago I was asked by Copac to write a piece about the Library that I work in, and I was only too happy to oblige as I can proudly say I work in a very special library, which I’d love to tell you more about…

My name is Emma, and I’m the Deputy Librarian at the Library of the Zoological Society of London.  We’re situated just on the edge of Regent’s Park, next to London Zoo, and we are one of the largest (and oldest) zoological libraries in the world!  We have in the region of 200,000 items on our shelves, comprising of about 40,000 books, 5000 journal titles, along with art works and archives, all of which are related to the study of zoology.  We also have nearly 20,000 unique records on Copac, demonstrating how unusual some of the items in our collection are.

Photo of ZSL Library interior

ZSL Library interior

You may have noticed that I tend to stress that the Library is part of the Zoological Society of London, and that’s because ZSL is made up of many departments working together on a range of projects, across the globe.  ZSL is comprised of not only London Zoo, but also Whipsnade Zoo, and very importantly the huge team of scientists and conservationists that make up two departments called the Institute of Zoology and Conservation Programmes.   The Library has the challenging task of trying to support the needs of the staff in all of these areas (many of whom are overseas) ranging from ordering books about the naked mole rat for Keeper staff here in London, to helping with literature searching about the red panda for our colleagues out in Nepal!  The Library is also open to members of the public, with the hope that we might inspire an enthusiasm for the conservation of animals.

Also, people are often surprised to find out that the Zoological Society of London has a rich history – a history that the Library has been intertwined with from ZSL’s founding in 1826.  In 1826, an ambitious man named Sir Stamford Raffles founded ZSL to meet the needs of the growing zoological community.  One of the obvious aims was to create a living collection of animals, but another very important goal was to create a leading zoological library.  In the early days the library had various locations across London, including Leicester Square and Hannover Square, but by 1910 it was decided that the library should be closer to the living animal collection in Regent’s Park, and from that day on is where the Library has remained.

To give an idea of the kind of material ZSL Library holds, we wanted to share with you some of the highlights of the collection, but it has been proving very difficult to select just a few as there are so many to choose from!  So I hope you don’t mind that I’ve selected a few that are my personal favourites, and hopefully you can see why.

Historiae animalium / by Konrad Gessner (1516-1565). – Tiguri : Froschover, 1551-85

Konrad Gessner was a Swiss naturalist, who was trying to describe all of the animals that were known (and unknown) at the time, and his 5 book work, Historiae animalium, is the culmination of his efforts.  In these books can be found descriptions of mammals, birds, fish and reptiles – some accurate, but some curious, like this ‘giraffe’ below.  This is also one of our oldest books in the Library.

‘Giraffe’ picture - Historiae animalium

‘Giraffe’ picture – Historiae animalium by Konrad Gessner (1516-1565).

Daily Occurrences

The Library also contains a unique archival collection relating to the history of ZSL, and one of our more heavily consulted items is a series of volumes called Daily Occurrences.  They record the comings and goings of animals at both London and Whipsnade Zoos, from both of the zoos foundation to the present day (admittedly the current ones are electronic).  This particular page shows the arrival of one of the stars London Zoo – Jumbo the Elephant.

Photo of Daily Occurrences – 26th June 1865

Daily Occurrences – 26th June 1865

Illustrations of the family of Psittacidae, or parrots, the greater part of them species hitherto unfigured… / by Edward Lear (1812-1888). – London : Lear, 1832

Edward Lear is most commonly known for his ‘nonsense poetry’ (i.e. the Owl and the Pussycat), but Lear was also a phenomenally talented artist whose skill influenced the style of others, such as the ornithologist John Gould and his wife Elizabeth.  One of Lear’s most beautiful works is his volume on the family of parrots, of which the illustrations were based on the birds in ZSL’s parrot house.

Image of Parrot from Illustrations of the family of Psittacidae

Illustrations of the family of Psittacidae, or parrots, the greater part of them species hitherto unfigured… / by Edward Lear (1812-1888). – London : Lear, 1832.

ZSL Library welcomes  members of the public, as well as Staff and Fellows of the ZSL.  As well as being able to make use of our resources, we usually have something of interest on display and there are always paintings and sculptures to admire in the Reading Room. To find out more please email library@zsl.org or consult our web pages http://www.zsl.org/about-us/zsl-library-collection.  Don’t forget to follow on Twitter @ZSLArts

Emma Milnes
Assistant Librarian
The Library
The Zoological Society of London

All images copyright the Zoological Society of London and reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright holder.

 

Royal Holloway, University of London Library catalogue loaded

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of the Royal Holloway, University of London Library have been added to Copac.

Photograph of the Library at Royal Holloway, University of London

Founder’s Library at Royal Holloway, University of London. Image copyright: Royal Holloway, University of London.

Royal Holloway College, originally a women-only college, was founded by the Victorian entrepreneur, Thomas Holloway in 1879. The campus is set in 135 acres of woodland near Windsor, and is acknowledged as one of the country’s most appealing campuses, offering a close-knit community based location with close proximity to London.

Royal Holloway Library Services occupies two sites on campus – the Bedford Library, opened by The Princess Royal in 1993, houses resources for Science, Social Sciences and History, while the Founder’s Library, located within the magnificent Founder’s Building, modelled on the Chateau de Chambord and opened by Queen Victoria in 1886, houses Languages, Literatures, Cinema, Theatre, Fine Arts and Music. Currently under construction is a new Library and Student Services building due to open in 2017. This will dramatically expand our library and study space, provide flexible learning and public spaces and a dedicated study area for PhD students. It will also provide a purpose-built storage space for Royal Holloway’s art and archives, as well as the Library’s Special Collections.

The Library’s book collections extend to some 600,000 volumes. There are subscriptions to more than 17,000 e-journals; more than 800,000 items are loaned each year and there is an annual footfall of about 700,000.

To browse, or limit your search to the Royal Holloway, University of London Library, go to the main tab on copac.jisc.ac.uk and choose ‘Royal Holloway, University of London Library’ from the list of libraries.