Catalogues of Cardiff Metropolitan University Library and Brunel University London Library added to Copac

We are pleased to announce that the records of Cardiff Metropolitan University Library and the full holdings of Brunel University London Library have been added to Copac.

Cardiff Metropolitan University LibraryLibrary & Information Services (L&IS) are at the heart of the learning, teaching and research experience for students and staff at Cardiff Metropolitan University. Their two Learning Centres at the Llandaff and Cyncoed campuses house a vast collection of physical material covering all academic disciplines and research areas of Cardiff Met. The collection is complemented by significant and continued investment in electronic resources.

The library’s special collections relate to various areas of study within the Cardiff School of Art and Design, Cardiff School of Education and Cardiff School of Sport and Health Sciences.

For more information see Cardiff Metropolitan University Library’s information page on Copac.

To browse their records, select the Main Search tab on Copac and choose ‘Cardiff Metropolitan University’ from the list of libraries.

Copac previously included the records for Brunel University London Library’s Special Collections. However this has now been expanded to include Brunel’s complete holdings.

Photograph of Mural by Joe Tilson in Brunel University Library

Mural by Joe Tilson in Brunel University Library (Image copyright: Brunel University)

Brunel University London Library is situated in the Bannerman Centre, at the heart of the Brunel University campus. Housed over four floors, the main library collection includes over 300,000 print books and other materials, as well as a large collection of online resources.

Special Collections at Brunel University London houses a variety of book and archival collections dating principally from the 19th century onwards, which have mostly been collected since the 1980s. They include comprehensive collections relating to transport history (particularly railways), the history of tunneling under the English Channel, and working class autobiographies. Other themes are poetry and dialect, Shakespeare authorship and issues around equality and advocacy (including disability history and anti-apartheid campaigning).

For more information see Brunel University London Library’s information page on Copac.

To browse or limit your search to Brunel’s holdings, select the Main Search tab in Copac and choose ‘Brunel University London’ from the list of libraries.

Catalogue of the National Gallery Library added to Copac

We are pleased to announce that the records of the National Gallery Library have been added to Copac.

National Gallery Library

The National Gallery Library

The library was established in 1870 with the purchase of the private library (consisting of some 2,000 volumes) of the late Sir Charles Eastlake, first Director of the National Gallery. It now contains around 100,000 printed volumes relevant to the study of the history of paintings in the Western European tradition from the 13th to the early 20th century.

The library’s holdings include: monographs, catalogues raisonnés, exhibition catalogues, and pamphlets; works on iconography; permanent and private collection catalogues from the United Kingdom and elsewhere; early guidebooks and source works consisting of a few thousand published before 1850; catalogues of picture sales from major auction houses and commercial dealers; and over 250 periodical titles, of which 150 are current.

For more information see the National Gallery Library’s information page on Copac.

To browse their records, select the Main Search tab on Copac and choose ‘National Gallery Library’ from the list of libraries.

The Aga Khan Library, London

The Aga Khan Library, London

The Aga Khan Library, London

The Aga Khan Library, London, formerly known as the IIS-ISMC Library, is the result of the merger of the library of the Institute of Ismaili Studies and the library of the Institute for the Study of Muslim Civilisations, Aga Khan University.

As a shared library, the Aga Khan Library’s primary objective is to support teaching and research in its parent institutions. The Library, however, is also committed to fostering knowledge of Islam, past and present, and to facilitating access for external researchers and students to resources on the history, faith and cultures that comprise the global Ismaili Shia community.

Photo from the inauguration of the Aga Khan Library on June 26th 2018

His Highness the Aga Khan in conversation with Lord Ahmad, Mayor Sadiq Khan, His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, and Head Librarian of the Aga Khan Library Dr. Walid Ghali during the inauguration of the Aga Khan Library on June 26th 2018

With its relocation to new purpose-built premises in King’s Cross, the Aga Khan Library will be able to continue expanding its substantial collection, which covers a broad range of subjects relating to the work of both institutes, and includes works in a remarkable variety of European and Eastern languages, as well as several individual collections donated by acclaimed scholars in the field of Islamic Studies. Housed in state-of-the-art facilities, the Library now occupies two floors at the heart of the newly developed Aga Khan Centre, King’s Cross. This site offers a comfortable research space, and convenient access to the Library’s unique resources.

The Aga Khan Library

The Aga Khan Library

The Aga Khan Library is the proud custodian of part of the personal library of Professor Annemarie Schimmel (1922–2003) that includes many rare titles, mostly in Persian, Urdu and Sindhi, focusing on Indo-Muslim communities and cultures. This collection of 900 items was donated to the Library by Professor Ali Asani (1954–), her colleague at Harvard University, in 2005. Subsequently, over 300 volumes from the Schimmel Library at the University of Tübingen, Germany, were acquired to complement this collection.

In 2012, the Aga Khan Library received part of the personal library and the complete personal archive of Professor Mohammed Arkoun (1928–2010), in recognition of his long association with The Institute of Ismaili Studies. This legacy, mostly in Arabic and French, consists of his professional correspondence, notes, offprints of his articles and over 200 monographs, including theses on Islamic thought, history and culture. The Library has embarked on the process of cataloguing and digitising the Arkoun Archive, to aid research concerning this distinguished and highly influential scholar in the history of Islamic studies.

Detail of Persian manuscript on "Prediction with astrological tables" completed in Shawwal (945 AH. /1539 AD)

Detail of Persian manuscript on “Prediction with astrological tables”
completed in Shawwal (945 AH. /1539 AD

The Library acquired in 2010 the personal library of the late Prof Peter Avery OBE, an eminent British scholar in the field of Persian Studies. This collection contains approximately 1,600 volumes, including manuscripts, lithographs and many rare and out-of-print titles in Persian, English and Arabic.

In 2007, the library purchased a collection of works by Muhammad Abduh (1849-1905) which consists of three previously unrecorded manuscripts; thirteen printed works (five by Abduh and eight by other scholars on Abduh), and one original studio portrait of Muhammad Abduh with his friend the Egyptian photographer Muhammad ‘Ali Effendi Sa’oudi (1865-1955).

Among the Library’s other collections of note, there are 1300 books in Turkish and Ottoman Turkish that include literary works from the Tanzimat and post-Tanzimat period (mainly novels, poetry and plays) as well as travel literature, language materials, and works of history.

Illumination with flower motifs in an Ottoman manuscript (19th Century)

Illumination with flower motifs in an Ottoman manuscript (19th Century)

The manuscripts, as well as many of the rare books, are part of a digitisation project that will both conserve the original items and widen access to the Library’s important collections. While the Aga Khan Library builds its electronic platform for digitised materials, the original documents are available by request, condition permitting.

We would like to invite you to browse our collections through Copac or EDS. Soon, the Aga Khan Library will be available to researchers from London, the UK and abroad. In the meantime, the interlibrary loan service is available, and if necessary, access to our facilities and collections can be arranged by prior request. Please do not hesitate to contact us with further information about your access requirements.

Pedro Sánchez, Assistant Librarian

For more information you can contact the library by email, or telephone +44 (0)20 7380 3852.

NOTE: The Aga Khan Library still appears on Copac as the Institute of Ismaili Studies & ISMC Library. We are in the process of updating the library’s name and other details, but in the meantime you should select the Institute of Ismaili Studies & ISMC Library from the list of libraries in the main search form if you wish to search for their records.

Catalogue of Historic England Library added to Copac

We are pleased to announce that the records of the Historic England Library have been added to Copac.

Rare books at the Historic England Library

Rare books at the Historic England Library

The Historic England Library contains extensive collections on the archaeology and architecture of England. Contents date from the late 1500s up to the present day, with parts of the collection inherited from The Ministry of Works. This includes the Mayson Beeton Collection, a collection of some 830 books focused on London and its surroundings, dating from 1633 to 1940.

Other collection strengths include long runs of national and county periodicals, and material collected on specific geographic areas.

The Library contains approximately 60,000 book titles, reports, pamphlets, etc., along with 1200 periodical titles, of which c.400 are active. The collection is reference only.

The Historic England catalogue also includes records for titles freely downloadable from the Historic England Research Report Series gateway and the Historic England publications database.

For more information see the Historic England Library’s information page on Copac.

To browse their records, select the Main Search tab on Copac and choose ‘Historic England’ from the list of libraries.

Catalogue of Sheffield Hallam University Library added to Copac

We’re pleased to announce that the records of Sheffield Hallam University Library have been added to Copac.

Photo of Adsetts Library, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University

Adsetts Library, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University

The history of the University can be traced back to 1843 when the Sheffield School of Design was founded. In 1969 a number of colleges merged to form Sheffield City Polytechnic. In 1992 it became Sheffield Hallam University. More information about the history of the institution can be found here: www.shu.ac.uk/about-us/our-history.

Sheffield Hallam University’s Library Service holds over 520,000 physical books, 207,000 e-books and 74,000 e-journal titles in its collections. The service is delivered over two libraries, one at each campus.

The Adsetts Library, based at City Campus, is the largest library and houses material that supports the wide range of subjects taught on the campus. It also houses a number of special collections.

The Collegiate Library is approximately 1 mile from the city centre and houses material that supports the teaching at Collegiate Campus. This is primarily nursing and allied health, psychology, law and sports sciences.

Collection areas include:

  • The Teaching Practice collection
  • The TESOL collection
  • The Special Collection (includes a Festival of Britain collection and material related to the Sheffield School of Art)
  • The Readership and Literary Cultures Collection
  • Film Studies, and Art and Design material
  • The Corvey Collection

For more information see Sheffield Hallam’s library information page on Copac.

To browse their records, select the Main Search tab on Copac and choose ‘Sheffield Hallam University’ from the list of libraries.

More about London Metropolitan University Library Services

Library Services at London Metropolitan University are delighted to have our collections available on Copac, and hope that the increased visibility will create new interest in our holdings.

Our main collections cover a large breadth of subject areas, ranging across Human Sciences, Languages, Social Sciences, Business and Law, and are held over our two campuses at Holloway Road and Aldgate.

We have particularly strong holdings in the areas of Art, Architecture and Design, in support of the university’s renowned department The Cass. This collection is located in our Aldgate Library, which was partially refurbished in 2016 to accommodate this stock. We regularly promote our collection via book displays and social media, often tying in to university and external events.

Photo of book display related to Project Red fashion show at The Cass

Book display related to Project Red fashion show at The Cass. Photograph by John Verrall.

We also have an Artists’ Books Collection located within our Special Collections Reading Room, comprising limited edition works made and produced by artists and hobbyists, including leading contemporary artists such as Michael Landy, Sam Taylor-Wood, David Shrigley and Andy Goldsworthy.

Photograph of samples from LMU's Artists' Books Collection

Samples from our Artists’ Books Collection. Photograph by John Verrall.

Library Services is an ever-evolving part of London Metropolitan University: to keep up with our latest developments, please follow us on our social media accounts on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

You can also find out more about Library Services, including contact details and visitor information, here.

Catalogue of London Metropolitan University added to Copac

We’re please to announce that the records of London Metropolitan University have been added to Copac.

London Metropolitan University, Aldgate Library

Library Services at London Metropolitan University operate across 3 sites:

  • Holloway Road Library contains Human Sciences, Languages and Social Sciences material
  • Aldgate Library contains Art, Architecture and Design, and Business and Law material
  • Special Collections holds collections such as the Frederick Parker Collection, the Archive of the Irish in Britain, and the Trades Union Congress Collection.

For more information see their Copac library page.

To browse their records, select the Main Search tab on Copac and choose ‘London Metropolitan University’ from the list of libraries.

Catalogues of Bangor University Library and Northumbria University Library added to Copac

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of Bangor University Library and Northumbria University Library have been added to Copac.

Photograph of Bangor University Library

Bangor University Library

Bangor University Library holds an extensive range of print and electronic resources, and also has one of the largest university-based archives in the UK, cared for by its internationally recognised Archives and Special Collections department.

The service is housed over four libraries:

  • Main Library – holds collections for Arts, Languages, Humanities, Social Sciences, Music, Law, the Welsh Library, and is the location of the Archives and Special Collections department.
  • Deiniol Library – holds collections for Sciences, Psychology and Healthcare Sciences. Also kept here is a large collection of Ordnance, Soil and Geological Survey maps.
  • Normal Library – holds materials related to Education, Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences and collections of children’s books.
  • Wrexham Library – holds materials on Nursing, Midwifery, Radiography and Healthcare Sciences.

You can find out more about the library on their Copac information page, and see descriptions of their archival collections at the Archives Hub.

Northumbria University Library holds comprehensive digital and print collections, comprising over 550,000 print books, over 822,000 ebooks and in excess of 108,000 online journals and print journals.

The service is housed over three libraries:

  • City Campus Library – is the largest of the libraries and houses collections that support all of the subjects that are taught at City Campus. The library has been extensively refurbished since 2013.
  • Coach Lane Library – based on the east side of Coach Lane Campus, and houses collections that support all of the subjects that are taught at Coach Lane Campus.
  • Law Practice Library – situated within City Campus East and is located on the first floor of the CCE1 Building (Business and Law), and it houses a reference collection of law resources, including textbooks, law reports and journals.

You can find out more about the library on their Copac information page.

To browse or limit your search to the holdings of either library, select the Main Search tab in Copac and choose the library name from the list of libraries.

LGBTQ and Alternative Sexuality Journals at the Bishopsgate Institute

Stefan Dickers, Library and Archives Manager at the Bishopsgate Institute, introduces us to the Institute’s diverse collection of LGBTQ and alternative sexuality journals.

Bishopsgate Institute is home to one of the most comprehensive and accessible special collections and archives documenting Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) histories in Britain. We started collecting LGBTQ materials in 2011, as part of our commitment to recording hidden histories and to preserving and sharing the history of protest and radicalism.

These collections are based around the Lesbian and Gay Newsmedia Archive (LAGNA), a collection of over 300,000 press cuttings from the straight press documenting LGBTQ history, culture and politics since the early 1900s. We are now also home to the archives of organisations such as Stonewall, Switchboard: the LGBT+ helpline and the Campaign for Homosexual Equality, along with individuals such as LGBTQ writer and campaigner Paris Lees. Bishopsgate Institute also holds a dedicated LGBTQ Library of over 6,000 fiction, non-fiction, academic and pulp fiction books.

Another key aspect of the LGBTQ holdings is the Journal Collection, which holds over 500 different journal titles. Dating from the 1950s onwards, the collection demonstrates the variety of different groups and interests that can be found within the LGBTQ community. There are a large range of genres reflected within the collection, including lifestyle, campaigns, politics and culture. The collection features well-known titles such as ‘Gay News/Gay Times’, ‘Capital Gay’, ‘Diva’ and ‘The Pink Paper’, along with rare and more specific journals which are created by local or niche organisations such as ‘BLGYN (The Bradford Lesbian and Gay Youth Newsletter)’ and ‘Gay Vegetarian Gazette’.

The collection has an international reach and appeal as it includes journals from across Europe and the USA. We are also about to provide a home to the largest collection of Australasian LGBTQ journals outside that continent. The experience of the transgender and gender variant community is also well represented, with holdings such as ‘TV/TS News’, ‘Beaumont Society Newsletter’ and ‘Transliving’, stretching back to the 1980s.

Bishopsgate Institute also holds a substantial amount of LGBTQ erotic and pornographic literature, including books, magazines and pulp fiction. These holdings began with material in the original deposit of the library of the Lesbian and Gay Newsmedia Archive in 2011 and have expanded with numerous subsequent deposits from individuals and organisations. The collection ranges from physique magazines of the 1950s to pornographic magazines from the 2000s. There is also adult material relating to gay and straight fetish, leather and rubber sexuality, BDSM, body modification, transvestism and other alternative sexualities. The collection is an important resource for the study of visual representations of gay and alternative sexuality from the 1950s to the present day.

The Journal Collection is consistently being added to and new donations are always welcome. All of the titles can be consulted in the Researchers’ Area of the Library at Bishopsgate Institute. We are open Monday to Friday, 10.00am to 5.30pm, and no appointment or ID is necessary.

 

Stefan Dickers, Library and Archives Manager, Bishopsgate Institute

Bishopsgate Institute
230 Bishopsgate
London
EC2M 4QH

http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/

Call: 0207 392 9270
Email: library@bishopsgate.org.uk

All images are from the Bishopsgate Institute’s LGBTQ Journals Collection.

You can browse the Bishopsgate Library’s records on Copac.

More about the Science Museum Library

The Science Museum Library’s records were added to Copac in February 2017. In this piece Nick Wyatt, Head of Library & Archives at the museum, tells us more about the library and its collections.

Dana Research Centre and Library © Tim Soar/Coffey Architects

The Science Museum’s library collections are a world-class resource for the historian of the science, technology and medicine. For many years the Library shared a building and catalogue with Imperial College but this arrangement ended in early 2014 when the last of the Library’s collections were moved from London to the Museum’s stores at Wroughton, near Swindon. The catalogue then ceased to be available on Copac.

The closure of the old library allowed staff to plan for a new library in London and procure a new catalogue. There followed an intense period as the new library was designed and built, services reconfigured, collections moved and new staff appointed. In November 2015 the Science Museum’s splendid Dana Research Centre and Library was opened and then formally launched in March 2016, together with the new library and archive catalogues. The library is a beautiful, relaxing and inspirational space, designed by Coffey Architects, that has received many positive reviews from architects, librarians and researchers.  Visitors have been impressed by the continuity of design and attention to detail which makes the experience of using the library very rewarding. There are some beautiful images of the new Dana Research Centre and Library, showing the dappling of light within the space, here.

The library is a physical manifestation of the Museum’s strong commitment to research and scholarship. It caters for academic researchers and scholars, for the family and local historian, for the enthusiast and the curious. There are 18 reading desks, around 6000 volumes of books and journals in the history and biography of science, technology and medicine, and access to the new library and archive catalogues and to other electronic resources. Readers can also use the library’s digital microfilm reader – the library has Britain’s only microfilm copy of the Archive for the History of Quantum Physics.  Digital copies of original material can be produced for consultation or purchase, including large format engineering drawings. Readers can also consult archives and library material transported from Wroughton. Library staff are available to help readers find out about the Science Museum’s library, archive and object collections. Researchers can also consult museum object files in the new reading room.

Two Marconiphone Television and Radio Trade Catalogues, 1939 © Trustees of the Science Museum Group

The Wroughton site has its own reading room which remains open by prior appointment on Fridays for researchers, especially those wishing to consult large quantities of material brought from the stores. Occupying over 25 kilometres of closed-access shelving, the collections cover the worldwide development of science, technology, industry, medicine and related subjects over the past 500 years. Original printed works (in English and other European languages) include books, journals, patents, directories, trade literature, international exhibition publications and maps.

The new Library catalogue, available here, documents a large part of our library holdings stored at our Wroughton site and everything shelved in the Research Centre.  Over three quarters of the catalogued book collections are on the computer catalogue. These include all histories and biographies of science, technology and medicine; all books published before 1800; nineteenth-century books on mathematics, the physical sciences, medicine, engineering, and scientific exploration; twentieth-century books on general science, mathematics, astronomy, physics, chemistry, medicine, transport and scientific exploration; and everything published after 1983.

Some Science Museum Library rare books © Trustees of the Science Museum Group

The catalogue records for these books were added to Copac in February 2017 after an absence of over three years and now are clearly attributed to the Science Museum Library. Work continues to edit and upgrade records and add new ones for recent acquisitions and older material. Uncatalogued collections are also being documented so recent additions include many of the books from the Walt Patterson Collection on nuclear energy and nuclear policy. Library staff at Wroughton can also check the card catalogues for untraced material.

The archives hold original records of some of the most famous and influential individuals and companies in the fields of science, medicine, engineering and industry. Archives are documented on a separate catalogue shared with other Science Museum Group museums and sometimes include printed materials.

The Science Museum Library & Archive collections offer significant opportunities for further research and exploitation. For example, the Trade Literature Collection, one of the largest in Britain and largely undocumented and unexploited, has huge potential. Containing mainly British manufacturers’ and distributors’ catalogues, advertisements and owners’ manuals, it covers a wide range of subjects including catalogues for bicycles, cars, radios, domestic appliances, sanitary ware, scientific and medical equipment. There are many avenues to be explored, including the history of companies, product design, distribution and advertising, or the language of technical manuals.  Library volunteers have listed over 16,000 trade literature items and in the coming years we hope to convert this growing list to add to the catalogue and thereafter to Copac.

There are many synergies between the library, archive and object collections. Our extensive history and biography collection can add a wider historical or social context for visitors wanting to learn more. Trade or international exhibition catalogues and user manuals can document Science Museum objects, allowing the researcher to compare the printed description and illustration to the product itself. The Science Museum recently launched its Collections Online portal, allowing researchers to search its archives and objects in one place and view higher resolution images. Digitised library material will be added at a later stage.

The Library welcomes enquiries about its collections by phone, email, or in person. For opening times, contact details, access to catalogues and other information about our collections see our web pages.

Nick Wyatt, Head of Library & Archives, Science Museum

The Dana Research Centre and Library
165 Queen’s Gate
London
SW7 5HD

Call: 020 7942 4242
Email: smlinfo@sciencemuseum.ac.uk