Copac Beta Interface

We’ve just released the beta test version of a new Copac interface and I thought I’d write a few notes about it and how we’ve created it.

Some of the more significant changes to the search result page (or “brief display” as we call it) are:

  • There are now links to the library holdings information pages directly from the brief display. You no longer have to go via the “full record” page to get to the holdings information.
  • You can see a more complete view of a record by clicking on the magnifying glass icon at the end of the title. This enables you to quickly view a more detailed record without having to leave the brief display.
  • You can quickly edit your query terms using the search forms at the top of the page.
  • To further refine your search you can add keywords to the query by typing them into the “Search within results”  box.
  • You can change the number of records displayed in the result page.

The pages have been designed using Responsive Web Design techniques — which is jargon that means that the HTML5 and CSS have been designed in such a way that the web page rearranges itself depending on the size of your screen. The new interface should work whether you are using a desktop with a cinema display, a tablet computer or a mobile phone. Users of those three display types will see a different arrangement of screen elements and some may be missing altogether on the smaller displays. If you use a tablet computer or smartphone, then please give beta a try on them and let us know what you think.

The CGI script that creates the web pages is a C++ application which outputs some fairly simple, custom, XML. The XML is fed through an XSLT stylesheet to produce the HTML (and also the various record export formats.) Opinion on the web seems divided on whether or not this is a good idea; the most valid complaints seem to be that it is slow. It seems fast enough to us and the beta way of doing things is actually an improvement as there is now just one XSLT used in creating the display, whereas our old way of doing things used multiple XSLT stylesheets run multiple times for each web page. Which probably just goes to show that the most significant eater of time is the searching of the database rather than the creation of the HTML.

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