More about London Metropolitan University Library Services

Library Services at London Metropolitan University are delighted to have our collections available on Copac, and hope that the increased visibility will create new interest in our holdings.

Our main collections cover a large breadth of subject areas, ranging across Human Sciences, Languages, Social Sciences, Business and Law, and are held over our two campuses at Holloway Road and Aldgate.

We have particularly strong holdings in the areas of Art, Architecture and Design, in support of the university’s renowned department The Cass. This collection is located in our Aldgate Library, which was partially refurbished in 2016 to accommodate this stock. We regularly promote our collection via book displays and social media, often tying in to university and external events.

Photo of book display related to Project Red fashion show at The Cass

Book display related to Project Red fashion show at The Cass. Photograph by John Verrall.

We also have an Artists’ Books Collection located within our Special Collections Reading Room, comprising limited edition works made and produced by artists and hobbyists, including leading contemporary artists such as Michael Landy, Sam Taylor-Wood, David Shrigley and Andy Goldsworthy.

Photograph of samples from LMU's Artists' Books Collection

Samples from our Artists’ Books Collection. Photograph by John Verrall.

Library Services is an ever-evolving part of London Metropolitan University: to keep up with our latest developments, please follow us on our social media accounts on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

.You can also find out more about Library Services, including contact details and visitor information, here.

Birkbeck, University of London Library catalogue added to Copac

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of Birkbeck, University of London Library have been added to Copac.

Photo of Birkbeck, University of London Library

Photo of Birkbeck, University of London Library

Spread across five floors of the main Birkbeck building in Bloomsbury, central London, this richly-resourced library holds more than 300,000 items covering subjects including applied linguistics, economics, mathematics and statistics, law, psychology and Victorian studies, as well as offering a wealth of online resources.

You can find out more about the library on their Copac information page, and see descriptions of their archival collections at the Archives Hub.

To browse or limit your search to its holdings, select the Main Search tab in Copac and choose ‘Birkbeck, University of London Library’ from the list of libraries.

Catalogue of London Metropolitan University added to Copac

We’re please to announce that the records of London Metropolitan University have been added to Copac.

London Metropolitan University, Aldgate Library

Library Services at London Metropolitan University operate across 3 sites:

  • Holloway Road Library contains Human Sciences, Languages and Social Sciences material
  • Aldgate Library contains Art, Architecture and Design, and Business and Law material
  • Special Collections holds collections such as the Frederick Parker Collection, the Archive of the Irish in Britain, and the Trades Union Congress Collection.

For more information see their Copac library page.

To browse their records, select the Main Search tab on Copac and choose ‘London Metropolitan University’ from the list of libraries.

Catalogues of Bangor University Library and Northumbria University Library added to Copac

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of Bangor University Library and Northumbria University Library have been added to Copac.

Photograph of Bangor University Library

Bangor University Library

Bangor University Library holds an extensive range of print and electronic resources, and also has one of the largest university-based archives in the UK, cared for by its internationally recognised Archives and Special Collections department.

The service is housed over four libraries:

  • Main Library – holds collections for Arts, Languages, Humanities, Social Sciences, Music, Law, the Welsh Library, and is the location of the Archives and Special Collections department.
  • Deiniol Library – holds collections for Sciences, Psychology and Healthcare Sciences. Also kept here is a large collection of Ordnance, Soil and Geological Survey maps.
  • Normal Library – holds materials related to Education, Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences and collections of children’s books.
  • Wrexham Library – holds materials on Nursing, Midwifery, Radiography and Healthcare Sciences.

You can find out more about the library on their Copac information page, and see descriptions of their archival collections at the Archives Hub.

Northumbria University Library holds comprehensive digital and print collections, comprising over 550,000 print books, over 822,000 ebooks and in excess of 108,000 online journals and print journals.

The service is housed over three libraries:

  • City Campus Library – is the largest of the libraries and houses collections that support all of the subjects that are taught at City Campus. The library has been extensively refurbished since 2013.
  • Coach Lane Library – based on the east side of Coach Lane Campus, and houses collections that support all of the subjects that are taught at Coach Lane Campus.
  • Law Practice Library – situated within City Campus East and is located on the first floor of the CCE1 Building (Business and Law), and it houses a reference collection of law resources, including textbooks, law reports and journals.

You can find out more about the library on their Copac information page.

To browse or limit your search to the holdings of either library, select the Main Search tab in Copac and choose the library name from the list of libraries.

LGBTQ and Alternative Sexuality Journals at the Bishopsgate Institute

Stefan Dickers, Library and Archives Manager at the Bishopsgate Institute, introduces us to the Institute’s diverse collection of LGBTQ and alternative sexuality journals.

Bishopsgate Institute is home to one of the most comprehensive and accessible special collections and archives documenting Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) histories in Britain. We started collecting LGBTQ materials in 2011, as part of our commitment to recording hidden histories and to preserving and sharing the history of protest and radicalism.

These collections are based around the Lesbian and Gay Newsmedia Archive (LAGNA), a collection of over 300,000 press cuttings from the straight press documenting LGBTQ history, culture and politics since the early 1900s. We are now also home to the archives of organisations such as Stonewall, Switchboard: the LGBT+ helpline and the Campaign for Homosexual Equality, along with individuals such as LGBTQ writer and campaigner Paris Lees. Bishopsgate Institute also holds a dedicated LGBTQ Library of over 6,000 fiction, non-fiction, academic and pulp fiction books.

Another key aspect of the LGBTQ holdings is the Journal Collection, which holds over 500 different journal titles. Dating from the 1950s onwards, the collection demonstrates the variety of different groups and interests that can be found within the LGBTQ community. There are a large range of genres reflected within the collection, including lifestyle, campaigns, politics and culture. The collection features well-known titles such as ‘Gay News/Gay Times’, ‘Capital Gay’, ‘Diva’ and ‘The Pink Paper’, along with rare and more specific journals which are created by local or niche organisations such as ‘BLGYN (The Bradford Lesbian and Gay Youth Newsletter)’ and ‘Gay Vegetarian Gazette’.

The collection has an international reach and appeal as it includes journals from across Europe and the USA. We are also about to provide a home to the largest collection of Australasian LGBTQ journals outside that continent. The experience of the transgender and gender variant community is also well represented, with holdings such as ‘TV/TS News’, ‘Beaumont Society Newsletter’ and ‘Transliving’, stretching back to the 1980s.

Bishopsgate Institute also holds a substantial amount of LGBTQ erotic and pornographic literature, including books, magazines and pulp fiction. These holdings began with material in the original deposit of the library of the Lesbian and Gay Newsmedia Archive in 2011 and have expanded with numerous subsequent deposits from individuals and organisations. The collection ranges from physique magazines of the 1950s to pornographic magazines from the 2000s. There is also adult material relating to gay and straight fetish, leather and rubber sexuality, BDSM, body modification, transvestism and other alternative sexualities. The collection is an important resource for the study of visual representations of gay and alternative sexuality from the 1950s to the present day.

The Journal Collection is consistently being added to and new donations are always welcome. All of the titles can be consulted in the Researchers’ Area of the Library at Bishopsgate Institute. We are open Monday to Friday, 10.00am to 5.30pm, and no appointment or ID is necessary.

 

Stefan Dickers, Library and Archives Manager, Bishopsgate Institute

Bishopsgate Institute
230 Bishopsgate
London
EC2M 4QH

http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/

Call: 0207 392 9270
Email: library@bishopsgate.org.uk

All images are from the Bishopsgate Institute’s LGBTQ Journals Collection.

You can browse the Bishopsgate Library’s records on Copac.

More about the Science Museum Library

The Science Museum Library’s records were added to Copac in February 2017. In this piece Nick Wyatt, Head of Library & Archives at the museum, tells us more about the library and its collections.

Dana Research Centre and Library © Tim Soar/Coffey Architects

The Science Museum’s library collections are a world-class resource for the historian of the science, technology and medicine. For many years the Library shared a building and catalogue with Imperial College but this arrangement ended in early 2014 when the last of the Library’s collections were moved from London to the Museum’s stores at Wroughton, near Swindon. The catalogue then ceased to be available on Copac.

The closure of the old library allowed staff to plan for a new library in London and procure a new catalogue. There followed an intense period as the new library was designed and built, services reconfigured, collections moved and new staff appointed. In November 2015 the Science Museum’s splendid Dana Research Centre and Library was opened and then formally launched in March 2016, together with the new library and archive catalogues. The library is a beautiful, relaxing and inspirational space, designed by Coffey Architects, that has received many positive reviews from architects, librarians and researchers.  Visitors have been impressed by the continuity of design and attention to detail which makes the experience of using the library very rewarding. There are some beautiful images of the new Dana Research Centre and Library, showing the dappling of light within the space, here.

The library is a physical manifestation of the Museum’s strong commitment to research and scholarship. It caters for academic researchers and scholars, for the family and local historian, for the enthusiast and the curious. There are 18 reading desks, around 6000 volumes of books and journals in the history and biography of science, technology and medicine, and access to the new library and archive catalogues and to other electronic resources. Readers can also use the library’s digital microfilm reader – the library has Britain’s only microfilm copy of the Archive for the History of Quantum Physics.  Digital copies of original material can be produced for consultation or purchase, including large format engineering drawings. Readers can also consult archives and library material transported from Wroughton. Library staff are available to help readers find out about the Science Museum’s library, archive and object collections. Researchers can also consult museum object files in the new reading room.

Two Marconiphone Television and Radio Trade Catalogues, 1939 © Trustees of the Science Museum Group

The Wroughton site has its own reading room which remains open by prior appointment on Fridays for researchers, especially those wishing to consult large quantities of material brought from the stores. Occupying over 25 kilometres of closed-access shelving, the collections cover the worldwide development of science, technology, industry, medicine and related subjects over the past 500 years. Original printed works (in English and other European languages) include books, journals, patents, directories, trade literature, international exhibition publications and maps.

The new Library catalogue, available here, documents a large part of our library holdings stored at our Wroughton site and everything shelved in the Research Centre.  Over three quarters of the catalogued book collections are on the computer catalogue. These include all histories and biographies of science, technology and medicine; all books published before 1800; nineteenth-century books on mathematics, the physical sciences, medicine, engineering, and scientific exploration; twentieth-century books on general science, mathematics, astronomy, physics, chemistry, medicine, transport and scientific exploration; and everything published after 1983.

Some Science Museum Library rare books © Trustees of the Science Museum Group

The catalogue records for these books were added to Copac in February 2017 after an absence of over three years and now are clearly attributed to the Science Museum Library. Work continues to edit and upgrade records and add new ones for recent acquisitions and older material. Uncatalogued collections are also being documented so recent additions include many of the books from the Walt Patterson Collection on nuclear energy and nuclear policy. Library staff at Wroughton can also check the card catalogues for untraced material.

The archives hold original records of some of the most famous and influential individuals and companies in the fields of science, medicine, engineering and industry. Archives are documented on a separate catalogue shared with other Science Museum Group museums and sometimes include printed materials.

The Science Museum Library & Archive collections offer significant opportunities for further research and exploitation. For example, the Trade Literature Collection, one of the largest in Britain and largely undocumented and unexploited, has huge potential. Containing mainly British manufacturers’ and distributors’ catalogues, advertisements and owners’ manuals, it covers a wide range of subjects including catalogues for bicycles, cars, radios, domestic appliances, sanitary ware, scientific and medical equipment. There are many avenues to be explored, including the history of companies, product design, distribution and advertising, or the language of technical manuals.  Library volunteers have listed over 16,000 trade literature items and in the coming years we hope to convert this growing list to add to the catalogue and thereafter to Copac.

There are many synergies between the library, archive and object collections. Our extensive history and biography collection can add a wider historical or social context for visitors wanting to learn more. Trade or international exhibition catalogues and user manuals can document Science Museum objects, allowing the researcher to compare the printed description and illustration to the product itself. The Science Museum recently launched its Collections Online portal, allowing researchers to search its archives and objects in one place and view higher resolution images. Digitised library material will be added at a later stage.

The Library welcomes enquiries about its collections by phone, email, or in person. For opening times, contact details, access to catalogues and other information about our collections see our web pages.

Nick Wyatt, Head of Library & Archives, Science Museum

The Dana Research Centre and Library
165 Queen’s Gate
London
SW7 5HD

Call: 020 7942 4242
Email: smlinfo@sciencemuseum.ac.uk

Creating Copac: Matching diverse data

Creating a database with many contributing libraries is an interesting process. The way in which different libraries catalogue their collections can vary significantly, for example. depending on the nature of the library and the catalogue system they use. In addition, there are record variations within individual library catalogues, reflecting changes over time in cataloguing standards, local systems, and individual cataloguing styles. In an ideal world we want one record in Copac for each document with details of all the libraries that hold a copy of that document. In practice this can be challenging… We’ve previously talked about our overall approach to deduplication, but the team that undertook the recent White Rose collection analysis project expressed a need to know more about how record matching works in Copac, so we’ve written a summary document setting out the basic match process all records go through as they are added to Copac.

In essence…
Incoming records go through an initial check to identify whether they might be duplicates of records already on Copac. If a match is found a ‘potential duplicate pair’ is created.

Potential duplicate pairs of records then go through a detailed match process to confirm whether they are genuine duplicates. Incoming records may form match pairs with multiple Copac records and each match pair is tested in turn.

  • If a pair of potentially duplicate records fail the detailed match tests the new incoming record is added to Copac as a single, unconsolidated, record.
  • If a pair of potentially duplicate records pass the detailed match tests the records are merged to form a consolidated record. If an incoming record has multiple match pairs that succeed in passing the detailed match all the records will be brought together in a single consolidated record; a record will never appear in more than one consolidation.
  • The incoming record may match with an existing Copac record that is itself already part of a larger set of records, so the new record will be merged into that larger consolidation. It is not necessary that each record in a consolidation matches every other record in that consolidation.

Each consolidated record can be ‘expanded’ in the Copac result display, so you can see all the originally supplied records that have been brought together to form that consolidation. This means all the information in a record from a specific library can be seen in context – particularly important for early materials.

The data deduplication is a fluid process and Copac records change daily in response to additions and deletions supplied by our contributing libraries. Similarly, the match process itself evolves over time as the data changes and new matching problems emerge. However, we need to be careful that in trying to improve our matching of some records we don’t create mistaken matches for others, which can result in incorrectly merging records.

The Copac Record match summary document provides a more detailed overview of the Copac record match process: Copac Record Match and Deduplication Procedure 1017

If you have any questions about this – or any other aspect of the Copac service – you can get touch via our helpdesk: help.copac@jisc.ac.uk

NBK and TLSS

At Jisc, we’ve never been afraid of a good acronym. But recently we’ve started moving more into meaningful project names. Alas, as excellent intentions so often do, it comes up against expediency, leading to an outbreak of abbreviations.

Two of these meaningfully-named but oft-abbreviated projects are the National Bibliographic Knowledgebase (NBK) and Transforming Library Support Services (TLSS).

TLSS is an on-going programme of work within Jisc to implement more efficient and effective library services and enabling us to continue to deliver the needs of libraries with existing and new services. The NBK is an important aspect of this, and is one of the TLSS transformation activities. You can read more about TLSS, and keep up-to-date on activities and progress, on the project blog: https://libraryservices.jiscinvolve.org/wp/

Another aspect of TLSS is joining-up communication across Jisc Library Support Services – we know that often you’re getting similar messages coming from different places within Jisc, and we’re trying to coordinate our communication so that you don’t need to monitor multiple channels to find out what’s going on. So from now on NBK progress updates will be posted on the TLSS project blog.

The British School at Athens Aerial Photograph Collection Digitisation Project

Penelope Zarganis, Librarian at the British School at Athens, tells us about a project to digitise the library’s unique collection of aerial photographs of Greece…

Photo of the reading room of the BSA's main library in Athens

The reading room of the BSA’s main library in Athens

The British School at Athens (BSA) is a post-graduate research institute for Hellenic Studies, one of the 7 British International Research Institutes sponsored by the British Academy. The School’s library and archive collections cover all aspects of research on Greece, from prehistory to the present day, in many different formats. In addition to the main library based in Athens, the School maintains a small library specialising in Cretan subjects at its research base at Knossos in Crete.The holdings of both libraries were added to Copac in February 2017.

Seventy years ago the British School at Athens was given a collection of aerial reconnaissance photographs of Greece taken during the Second World War by the RAF and Allied Forces between 1943 and 1945. The collection represents approximately 750 flights, resulting in more than 30,000 individual photographs or frames, showing the topography of Greece at that time. They are of interest to archaeologists for identifying or comparing archaeological sites, to anthropologists and geographers studying changes in land use or settlement organisation, and to historians of Greece during the Second World War for topographical information on the final years of the German occupation.

Photographic frame showing the centre of Athens

Photographic frame showing the centre of Athens. BSA ID U37_3277. The frisket reads: 3277 683/L211 AUG.18.45 F/20’’ 1030 25.000’. This can be transcribed as: Frame number 3277/Photographed by the British RAF 683 Squadron/Sortie L211/Date August 18th 1945/Focal length 20 inches/Time 10.30 am/Altitude 25,000 feet.

Recently the BSA library received funding for a two-stage project to make this collection of aerial photographs accessible online through the BSA’s website.

Initial research revealed that the collection is unique. The negatives were not saved and this collection of prints is the only one in existence. The prints were developed under wartime conditions and are deteriorating. This meant that while making the collection accessible we also had to conserve it. The prints are mostly 21cm x 21cm with a frisket (band) at one edge giving frame number, flight squadron details, date, time, focal length and height. Each flight has been assigned a local number to aid retrieval. The prints are exceptionally clear and designed to be viewed in three dimensions using stereoscopic lenses.

The first stage of the project, undertaken by Gian Piero Milani (Oxford University, 2017 onwards), mapped the flight paths of each run onto a digital map of Greece using GIS (geographical information system) technology. It is now possible to follow each flight in its entirety, and in the online index researchers can click on a region or sub-region to locate the individual flight paths, and identify the BSA ID number for each flight.

Image from the digital map of Greece, showing the Thessaloniki area with a flight path (black polygon) and individual frames (plane icons) marked, and the information box for a selected frame.

Image from the digital map of Greece, showing the Thessaloniki area with a flight path (black polygon) and individual frames (plane icons) marked, and the information box for a selected frame.

The second stage of the project involves digitising the prints and linking the digital images to the online index so that researchers can learn whether an aerial photograph exists for their area of interest without physically handling the fragile prints. In addition, GIS applications will enable us to enhance the geographical information associated with these images by linking them to satellite imagery.

A significant element of the project has been the use of the application QGIS to create the geo-referenced data that has been uploaded into the School’s digital management system (Axiell’s EMu), reducing the time required for creating and entering data.

This involved four stages of work:

1. Using QGIS to create data for each flight and each frame/print to be uploaded into EMu.

2. Linking this digital data record, through QGIS, to the geo-referenced flight path index on the BSA website. The standard for this level of geo-referencing was established by the National Collection of Aerial Photography (NCAP) based in Edinburgh. Each frame is indicated by a point/dot within a flight path. Selecting the dot brings up an information box about the frame/print taken from the data entered into EMu (note: this feature is not live on the BSA website at the time of writing, but will be available soon).

3. Creating a geographical index of the regions and sub-regions of Greece, using the European Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) to standardise the place-names. Researchers are thus able to select a region to identify which flights they need.

4. Scanning each frame/print and adding it to the relevant digital data record. This image will then be added as a thumbnail to the information box in the online index (not yet completed).

A photo-mosaic of some of the frames stitched together, taken from the flight path over Thessaloniki marked in the previous image.

A photo-mosaic of some of the frames stitched together, taken from the flight path over Thessaloniki marked in the previous image. The frisket reads: 682/570.OCT 7.44.F20″1420.6-21,000’Confidential. Transcribed: Photographed by the British RAF 682nd Squadron/Sortie 570/ Oct. 7th 1944/Focal length 20 inches/Time 14.20/Altitude 21,000 feet/Confidential.

Since the online index to these World War II allied reconnaissance flights was completed and made available on the British School at Athens website, interest in the collection has been impressive. The project will ultimately provide visual online access to the prints to enable researchers to identify precisely the areas photographed. It will also provide enhanced information for research citation, including source, date, and precise geo-referencing data (longitude and latitude), while preserving the collection by limiting physical access to the precious original prints.

The project is still in progress, but the index to the flights and the location index are accessible through the British School at Athens website.

For more information on the collection, contact the School’s Librarian, Penelope Wilson Zarganis.
For more information on the geo-referencing process, contact Gian Piero Milani.

Penelope Wilson Zarganis
Librarian

British School at Athens Library
Souedias 52
10676 Athens
Greece
+30 211 1022 822

library@bsa.ac.uk
www.bsa.ac.uk/index.php/departments-cat/library

All images copyright the British School at Athens, reproduced with kind permission of the copyright holder.

To browse the holdings of the British School at Athens Library, visit Copac.